Who were the Mortimers?

Warlike, ambitious and powerful, the Mortimers bestrode the medieval stage. Inextricably linked with the great events of their time, their story is the tale of a turbulent England racked with dissension, rebellion and open warfare at home and abroad. To read more about this amazing family click here

Forthcoming Events

Events organised by MHS are in red.

Sunday 17th June 2018 - Princes, Paupers and Priests: the Palmers' Guild in the late Middle Ages
A talk by Durham PhD student Rachael Harkes, organised by the Ludlow Palmers. 2.00 in St Laurence's church, Ludlow. The talk follows the short annual meeting of the Conservation Trust. This is a free event with tea and cake! If interested, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for catering purposes.

Thursday 21st June 2018 - MHS Summer Lecture
William Herbert and the March of Wales: Politics and Poetry in the Wars of the Roses
William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke was killed fighting for Edward IV during the rebellion of the Earl of Warwick. This talk charts the growing enmity between Pembroke and Warwick and emphasises the importance of the Mortimer estates in the March.
Helen Fulton is Professor of Medieval Literature at the University of Bristol.
7.30pm at the Market Theatre, Ledbury; members £5, non-members £8.
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Sunday 22nd July 2018 - MHS Study Visit
Cefnllys Castle and Abbey Cwm Hir

Cefnllys Castle was built by the Mortimers around 1242 on a hill just outside Llandrindod Wells, but it had a very chequered history. In 1262 it was destroyed by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd but was rebuild on an adjacent site in 1268 where it survived till it was once again sacked by the Welsh around 1294. Though little remains of the castles, it is an evocative place and an important site in Mortimer history. The Cistercian Cwmhir Abbey was founded in 1176 by Cadwallon ap Madog. Cadwallon was murdered by Roger Mortimer (d1214) in 1179 and the disruption caused by the ongoing struggles between the Mortimers and the Welsh meant that the abbey never flourished. There was to have been a huge church, but the building project was abandoned after the 14-bay nave had been completed. It is said that the headless body of Llywellyn ap Gruffudd was buried in the church after he met his death in 1282. Travel by cars.Members £5; non-members £8. 
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14th & 15th September 2018 - Members Visit to London - [all places taken]
Mortimer-Related Sites in London & The National Archives
Members make their own arrangements for travel and accommodation in London. On Friday 14th we will have the services of a guide in London and on the Saturday morning we will be enjoying a tour of the National Archives and inspecting Mortimer-related manuscripts.

Saturday 6th October 2018 - MHS Autumn Symposium
A varied and informal day of talks in Ludlow

This should prove a most interesting day in very comfortable surroundings. Confirmed speakers include:

*  Professor Sarah Hainsworth of Aston University is an eminent engineer and applied scientist. She was one of a group of experts who applied modern forensic techniques to the newly-discovered bones of Richard III. Her talk is entitled "Discovering how Richard III died".
* Best-selling author Anne O'Brien's subject is Elizabeth Mortimer, Shakespeare's 'Kate', whose rebellious husband Hotspur was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403.
* Twice a prizewinner in the MHS Essay Competition, Ethan Gould will be speaking on "Scottish Intrigue and Interference in Wales: 1315-1327"
* Dr David Simpkin is the author of "The English Aristocracy at War". He will be speaking about the Welsh wars of Edward I in which Roger Mortimer played such an important part until his death in 1282.



    Full details and booking arrangements later.